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transretropresentation in a-arts

twitter.com/filosonia:

    Sentences on Conceptual Art →

    gravitosardinha:

    by Sol Lewitt

    1. Conceptual artists are mystics rather than rationalists. They leap to conclusions that logic cannot reach.
    2. Rational judgements repeat rational judgements.
    3. Irrational judgements lead to new experience.
    4. Formal art is essentially rational.
    5. Irrational thoughts should be…
    — 2 weeks ago with 38 notes
    Contemporary diseases arts performance.

    Contemporary diseases arts performance.

    — 1 month ago with 1 note
    ihavenohonor:

Summoning the Dark Lord of the Art World
— college humor

    ihavenohonor:

    Summoning the Dark Lord of the Art World

    — college humor

    — 2 months ago with 63 notes

    fearandwar:

    From the brother of a woman killed on 9/11:

    I think now of every war memorial I ever yawned through on a class trip, how someone else’s past horror was my vacant diversion and maybe I learned something but I didn’t feel anything. Everyone should have a museum dedicated to the worst day of their life and be forced to attend it with a bunch of tourists from Denmark. Annotated divorce papers blown up and mounted, interactive exhibits detailing how your mom’s last round of chemo didn’t take, souvenir T-shirts emblazoned with your best friend’s last words before the car crash. And you should have to see for yourself how little your pain matters to a family of five who need to get some food before the kids melt down. Or maybe worse, watch it be co-opted by people who want, for whatever reason, to feel that connection so acutely.

    This tchotchke store — this building, this experience — is nothing more than the logical endpoint for our most reliably commodifiable national tragedy. If you want to bring a coffee table book full of photos of cadaver dogs sniffing through smoking rubble back home to wherever you’re from, hey, that’s great. This is America, you can buy what you want; they hate our freedom to buy what we want.

    (via notational)

    — 3 months ago with 3366 notes
    towerofsleep:

Value/Labor/Arts: The Manifestos | Art Practical

On April 19, 2014, The Arts Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley staged a day-long Practicum entitled Valuing Labor in the Arts. In addition to the workshop prompts and featured essays in this issue of Art Practical, we have included here a selection (and a reminder) of some recent and some not-so-very-old manifestos of artists who found themselves asking how they wanted to be valued and wondering whether the available value systems were up to the task. Some worried about authorship and ownership, some about invisibility, some about whether an artists’ union could combat a highly individuating art market that kept artists from working with each other.

    towerofsleep:

    Value/Labor/Arts: The Manifestos | Art Practical

    On April 19, 2014, The Arts Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley staged a day-long Practicum entitled Valuing Labor in the Arts. In addition to the workshop prompts and featured essays in this issue of Art Practical, we have included here a selection (and a reminder) of some recent and some not-so-very-old manifestos of artists who found themselves asking how they wanted to be valued and wondering whether the available value systems were up to the task. Some worried about authorship and ownership, some about invisibility, some about whether an artists’ union could combat a highly individuating art market that kept artists from working with each other.

    — 3 months ago with 7 notes
    Artistic autonomy and subsumption – The New Inquiry →

    It’s a measure of capitalism’s continued success and expansion that more and more people feel confident in describing themselves as creative, as artists. The neoliberalist turn hinges precisely on this, that more and more people can imagine themselves artists — in part because ordinary consumption has become a mode of personal expression, in part because capital has placed various forms of audience-building media at nearly every nonimpoverished individual’s disposal, in part because every scrap of one’s life gets turned to account as reputation, as human capital. We get an audience for our creative autonomy in action, a scenario which depends on (is subsumed by) the apparatus of communicative capitalism. If we are being “creative” without an audience, it no longer registers as an expression of autonomy; social media has crowded out the space in which an individual could be content to create without spectators. Now that is simply a failure of nerve, not independence — it’s too easy to circulate one’s gestures of creativity to rest easy in obscurity.

    (Source: towerofsleep)

    — 4 months ago with 44 notes